Autor Thema: CID Officer Henry Cox!  (Gelesen 31404 mal)

0 Mitglieder und 1 Gast betrachten dieses Thema.

Offline Lestrade

  • Superintendent
  • *****
  • Beiträge: 2949
  • Karma: +14/-3
  • Watson, fahr schon mal die Kutsche vor...
CID Officer Henry Cox!
« am: 15.11.2013 16:03 Uhr »
The least slip and another brutal crime might have been perpetrated under our very noses. It was not easy to forget that already one of them had taken place at the very moment when one of our smartest colleagues was passing the top of the dimly lit street.

Ich möchte hier einen Faden starten, in dem es mehr über eure einzelnen Meinungen und Einschätzungen dieses Zitats gehen soll und nicht primär um eine Diskussion darüber. Die Bedeutung und Deutung dieser Sätze könnte vieles ausdrücken.

Dieses Zitat stammt von Henry (Harry) Cox, Detective Inspector der City Police der offenbar ca. drei Monate nach dem Mord an Kelly an einer Überwachung beteiligt war. Es könnte sich dabei um den Kosminski handeln, den Anderson, Swanson als auch Macnaghten von den Kollegen der MET als Hauptverdächtigen der Ripper Morde ansahen bzw. als einen der Hauptverdächtigen. Auch über Sims und Griffiths haben wir etwas über diesen Mann gehört bzw. erfahren. Swanson nennt auch die City Police als den “Überwacher“ und Cox gehörte jener Einheit eben an. Genau wie seine Kollege Robert Sagar. Cox erwähnt auch die “Jews“, Kosminski war jüdischer Abstammung. Ebenfalls ähneln sich auch die Aussagen von Cox und Macnaghten, dass dieser Verdächtige einige Orte des Aufenthalts vorzuweisen hatte. Der Kollege von Cox, Sagar, sprach von der Butcher´s Row. Der letzte Angehörige der einen Kosminski (Aaron Kozminski) in eine Anstalt einwies, war Jacob Cohen (geb. Kozminski) der zu der Zeit ein erfolgreicher Butcher aus Manchester war aber auch an einem anderen Geschäft in London beteiligt gewesen war. Vieles spricht dafür, dass dieser Verdächtige bereits schon einmal im Oktober 1888 von der Polizei überwacht wurde (MET oder City Police). Da es angeblich einen PC am Mitre Square gab, der etwas gesehen haben will, käme auch hier bereits die City Police eher in Betracht, obwohl der Ort der Überwachung (Batty Street und Umgebung) unmittelbar neben dem Stride Tatort lag. Das Ende der Überwachungszeit von Cox, entpricht recht genau Macnaghten´s berüchtigtes "about march 1889".

Anbei der komplette Artikel mit Cox sowie weitere Links zu Cox und Sagar.

The Truth about the Whitechapel Mysteries told by Harry Cox
Ex-Detective Inspector, London City Police. Specially written for "Thomson's Weekly News"

It is only upon certain conditions that I have agreed to deal with the great Whitechapel crimes of fifteen years ago. Much has been written regarding the identity of the man who planned and successfully carried out the outrage...

It is my intention the relate several of my experiences while keeping this fellow under observation.

We had many people under observation while the murders were being perpetrated, but it was not until the discovery of the body of Mary Kelly had been made that we seemed to get upon the trail. Certain investigations made by several of our cleverest detectives made it apparent to us that a man living in the East End of London was not unlikely to have been connected with the crimes.

To understand the reason we must first of all understand the motive of the Whitechapel crimes. The motive was, there can not be the slightest doubt, revenge. Not merely revenge on the few poor unfortunate victims of the knife, but revenge on womankind. It was not a lust for blood, as many people have imagined.

The murderer was a misogynist, who at some time or another had been wronged by a woman. And the fact that his victims were of the lowest class proves, I think, that he was not, as has been stated, an educated man who had suddenly gone mad. He belonged to their own class.

Had he been wronged by a woman occupying a higher stage in society the murders would in all probability have taken place in the West End, the victims have been members of the fashionable demi-monde.

The man we suspected was about five feet six inches in height, with short, black, curly hair, and he had a habit of taking late walks abroad. He occupied several shops in the East End, but from time to time he became insane, and was forced to spend a portion of his time in an asylum in Surrey.

While the Whitechapel murders were being perpetrated his place of business was in a certain street, and after the last murder I was on duty in this street for nearly three months.

There were several other officers with me, and I think there can be no harm in stating that the opinion of most of them was that the man they were watching had something to do with the crimes. You can imagine that never    once did we allow him to quit our sight. The least slip and another brutal crime might have been perpetrated under our very noses. It was not easy to forget that already one of them had taken place at the very moment when one of our smartest colleagues was passing the top of the dimly lit street.

The Jews in the street soon became aware of our presence. It was impossible to hide ourselves. They became suddenly alarmed, panic stricken, and I can tell you that at nights we ran a considerable risk. We carried our lives in our hands so to speak, and at last we had to partly take the alarmed inhabitants into our confidence, and so throw them off the scent. We told them we were factory inspectors looking for tailors and capmakers who employed boys and girls under age, and pointing out the evils accruing from the sweaters' system asked them to co-operate with us in destroying it.

They readily promised to do so, although we knew well that they had no intention of helping us. Every man was as bad as another. Day after day we used to sit and chat with them, drinking their coffee, smoking their excellent cigarettes, and partaking of Kosher rum. Before many weeks had passed we were quite friendly with them, and knew that we could carry out our observations unmolested. I am sure they never once suspected that we were police detectives on the trail of the mysterious murderer; otherwise they would not have discussed the crimes with us as openly as they did.

We had the use of a house opposite the shop of the man we suspected, and, disguised, of course, we frequently stopped across in the role of customers.

Every newspaper loudly demanded that we should arouse from our slumber, and the public had lashed themselves into a state of fury and fear. The terror soon spread to the provinces too. Whenever a small crime was committed it was asserted that the Ripper had shifted his ground, and warning letters were received by many a terror stricken woman. The latter were of course the work of cruel practical jokers. The fact, by the way, that the murderer never shifted his ground rather inclines to the belief that he was a mad, poverty stricken inhabitant of some slum in the East End.

I shall never forget one occasion when I had to shadow our man during one of his late walks. As I watched him from the house opposite one night, it suddenly struck me that there was a wilder look than usual on his evil countenance, and I felt that something was about to happen. When darkness set in I saw him come forth from the door of his little shop and glance furtively around to see if he were being watched. I allowed him to get right out of the street before I left the house, and then I set off after him. I followed him to Lehman Street, and there I saw him enter a shop which I knew was the abode of a number of criminals well known to the police.

He did not stay long. For about a quarter of an hour I hung about keeping my eye on the door, and at last I was rewarded by seeing him emerging alone.

He made his way down to St George's in the East End, and there to my astonishment I saw him stop and speak to a drunken woman.

I crouched in a doorway and held my breath. Was he going to throw himself right into my waiting arms? He passed on after a moment or two, and on I slunk after him.

As I passed the woman she laughed and shouted something after me, which, however, I did not catch.

My man was evidently of opinion that he might be followed every minute. Now and again he turned his head and glanced over his shoulder, and consequently I had the greatest difficulty in keeping behind him.

I had to work my way along, now with my back to the wall, now pausing and making little runs for a sheltering doorway. Not far from where the model lodging house stands he met another woman, and for a considerable distance he walked along with her.

Just as I was beginning to prepare myself for a terrible ordeal, however, he pushed her away from him and set off at a rapid pace.

In the end he brought me, tired, weary, and nerve-strung, back to the street he had left where he disappeared into his own house.

Next morning I beheld him busy as usual. It is indeed very strange that as soon as this madman was put under observation, the mysterious crimes ceased, and that very soon he removed from his usual haunts and gave up his nightly prowls. He was never arrested for the reason that not the slightest scrap of evidence could be found to connect him with the crimes.


http://wiki.casebook.org/index.php/Henry_Cox

http://www.casebook.org/police_officials/po-sagar.html

http://wiki.casebook.org/index.php/Robert_Sagar

In der Hauptsache geht es mir um das eingangs erwähnte Zitat. Ich lade alle üblichen Verdächtigen hier dazu ein, ihre Meinung kundzutun. Gerne hätte ich auch Thomas seine Gedanken dazu, wenn er denn Zeit findet. Neben den Deutungen der Herren würde ich mich auch über Meinungen der Damen neben Angel sehr freuen. Dieser Tage sah ich Anirahtak und Claudia hier wieder öfters angemeldet. Fühlt euch eingeladen.

Bis Montag kann ich nur wenig im Forum unterwegs sein und man kann sich auch unabhängig davon viel Zeit mit seiner Meinung lassen. Nebenbei steht ja auch noch die Kartengeschichte an, unser Projekt mit der EastEnd Karte.

Beste Grüße,

Lestrade.
  

Wer wartet mit Besonnenheit, der wird belohnt zur rechten Zeit...

Offline Lestrat

  • Chief Inspector
  • ****
  • Beiträge: 133
  • Karma: +1/-0
Re: CID Officer Henry Cox!
« Antwort #1 am: 15.11.2013 19:47 Uhr »
Hallo Lestrade,

unglaublich was du da immer ausgräbst  :good:

also wenn ich das richtig übersetzt habe, würde das bedeuten das der Ripper miit dem Morden einfach so aufgehört hat weil er observiert wurde?? :shok:

Hmmmh, das hört sich doch sehr komisch an, die Beschreibung des Verdächtigen und seine beschriebenen Angewohnheiten würden ja recht gut zu (meinem derzeitigen) Bild des Rippers passen, aber das Ende??

Desto mehr ich mich mit den Morden befasse, komme ich zu der Ansicht das die Polizei keine rechte Ahnung hatte wer der Ripper war. Es wurden mehrere Verdächtige in Anstalten eingeliefert und das Morden hörte auf. Also war der Ripper wohl dabei, doch wer genau es war konnte man nicht mit Bestimmtheit sagen (das ist jetzt die Meinung die ICH MIR gebildet habe). Ganz sicher war man sich wohl aber nicht, da auch nach dem Mord an MJK weiterhin neue Verdächtige in den Täterkreis aufgenommen wurden (es sei denn die Polizei WUßTE wer der Ripper ist und hat absichtlich falsche Fährten gelegt, also doch Verschwörungstheorie :scratch_one-s_head:)


Gruß

Lestrat



Wenn man das Unmögliche ausgeschlossen hat, muss das, was übrig bleibt, die Wahrheit sein, so unwahrscheinlich sie auch klingen mag Arthur Conan Doyle

Offline Lestrade

  • Superintendent
  • *****
  • Beiträge: 2949
  • Karma: +14/-3
  • Watson, fahr schon mal die Kutsche vor...
Re: CID Officer Henry Cox!
« Antwort #2 am: 15.11.2013 21:51 Uhr »
Hi Lestrat,

Offenbar sieht es so aus (also könnte so gewesen sein), dass sich während einer ersten Observation (Oktober 1888) dieses Mannes kein weiterer Mord ereignete und sich das auch während einer zweiten Observation, nach dem Mord an Kelly (Anfang/Mitte November 1888 bis ca. März 1889), wiederholte, was dann ja sehr auffällig gewesen wäre. Danach war dieser Verdächtige weggesperrt worden aber wir wissen nicht wie lange und ob er bei seiner Entlassung erneut observiert wurde und wie oft sich so etwas eventuell wiederholt haben könnte.

Deshalb ja dieses erste, obige Zitat. Wie könnte man das interpretieren? Geschah dies in der Zwischenzeit dieser (möglichen) Observationen oder währenddessen? Oder gäbe es dafür eine Art “Zwischenlösung“? Wenn sich Menschen für etwas verantwortlich fühlen (und bei Cox scheint mir das möglich), dann mischen sie die Dinge manchmal etwas durcheinander, so dass man genau hinschauen oder hinhören muss, um zu verstehen, was wirklich passiert ist.

Alles andere dazu habe ich hier im Forum recht umfangreich breitgetreten. Aber eben ganz speziell zu diesem Zitat interessiert mich eure Interpretation. Vielleicht könnten wir uns darauf konzentrieren.

Nun aber wirklich ein schönes Wochenende,

Lestrade. 
Wer wartet mit Besonnenheit, der wird belohnt zur rechten Zeit...

Offline Isdrasil

  • Superintendent
  • *****
  • Beiträge: 2037
  • Karma: +2/-0
Re: CID Officer Henry Cox!
« Antwort #3 am: 17.11.2013 11:58 Uhr »
Hi Lestrade,

Von mir wirst du eine persoenliche Einschaetzung bekommen, kann aber wirklich dauern. Ich bitte da um Geduld, vielleicht schaffe ich es ja unter der Woche...

Koennte Dich jedenfalls ueberraschen...ich habe meinen Geist meditativ von allen Vorbehalten gereinigt.
  :Laie_69:

Gruesse, Isdrasil

Offline Lestrade

  • Superintendent
  • *****
  • Beiträge: 2949
  • Karma: +14/-3
  • Watson, fahr schon mal die Kutsche vor...
Re: CID Officer Henry Cox!
« Antwort #4 am: 17.11.2013 16:58 Uhr »
Da freue ich mich jetzt ja besonders… :yahoo:
Wer wartet mit Besonnenheit, der wird belohnt zur rechten Zeit...

Andromeda1933

  • Gast
Re: CID Officer Henry Cox!
« Antwort #5 am: 17.11.2013 19:37 Uhr »
Hallo Lestrade, alter Jäger!  :Laie_4:

Für mich ist es nicht einfach meine Gedanken zu sortieren. Aufgrund dieser Aussage verstehe ich Dein Beharren auf Kosminski noch besser. Auch wenn hier sein Name nicht genannt wird, ein möglicher Kreis infrage kommender Personen für diesen beschatteten Mann sollte sehr sehr klein gewesen sein. Statt einer zusammenhängenden Antwort (die sicher verwirrend ausfallen würde) versuche ich mich besser, auf das eine oder andere im einzelnen.
 
Das Eingangszitat ist kein einfaches Englisch, aber dennoch verständlich. Persönlich würde ich  “passing the top of the dimly lit street” so interpretieren, dass dieser nicht genannte Beamte zum Zeitpunkt eines der Morde am anderen Ende der schlecht beleuchteten Straße patrouillierte.
Der genaue Zeitpunkt ist leider nicht zu interpretieren. (tippen würde ich dabei auf den Mord im Mitre Square).

Der Kern des Berichts ist, laut Cox war zumindest eine Abteilung des Polizeiapparats davon überzeugt, der Mörder kam aus dem East End selbst.

Es geht zu guter Letzt auch um die Person des Ex-Beamten seiner Majestät, seiner Glaubwürdigkeit und auch um “Kamerad Zufall”. Zu letzterem später.
Unterlag Cox nicht auch 15 Jahren zurück liegenden Vorfällen gegenüber nach wie vor der Schweigepflicht? Oder durften pensionierte Beamte – siehe auch Major Smith – später aus dem Nähkästchen plaudern?
Ich will im nicht unterstellen, aus welchen Motiven auch immer (Geldnot, Wichtigtuerei) gegenüber Journalisten etwas erfunden zu haben. In diesem Zusammenhang wäre es doch schon interessant zu erfahren, wie es zu seinem Artikel kam. Ging er aus freien Stücken in die Redaktion (“Eh Leute, ich habe eine spannende Geschichte für Euch!”) oder wurde er von Journalisten (vielleicht auf Hinweis eines Dritten) angesprochen?
Seine Wortwahl ist eher die der realistischen Darstellung eines Geschehens, finde ich.
Außerdem bietet er keine Lösung an, nennt keinen Namen, scheint einzig von Erlebtem zu berichten. Das wertet seine Geschichte auf.

Als Motiv benennt Cox „Frauenhass“. Das darf nicht verwundern, denn damals hat sicher noch keiner über die vielen Möglichkeiten sexueller Perversion Bescheid gewusst, bzw. sie nicht zu hinterfragen getraut.

Den Täter sieht er aufgrund seiner Opferwahl als Mitglied der untersten Schicht, aus der eben auch die ermordeten Frauen stammten.

Ich stimme aber nicht ganz damit überein, dass der Mörder sich anderenfalls Opfer aus dem West End gesucht hätte. Die besseren Gegenden waren - zum Schutz gegen das „Gesindel“ von der Polizei gut kontrolliert. Die Menschen lebten dort nicht so beengt nebeneinander, man kannte im Regelfall seinen Nachbarn, viele Häuser hatten Personal usw. Wer nicht (pünktlich) nach Hause kam, wurde vermisst. In den besseren Viertel herrschte ein ganz anderes Sozialverhalten, es wäre schwer gewesen, selbst Hausangestellte zu überfallen. Im übervölkerten East End, wo jeder erst mal an sich selbst zuerst dachte, waren Frauen an jeder Ecke und zu jeder Tages-und Nachtzeit zu finden. Sie „lagen auf der Straße“, oftmals sogar im wortwörtlichen Sinne.

“He occupied several shops in the East End” –  soll das bedeuten zur gleichen Zeit?
Dann hätte Cox vermutlich “owned” oder “ran” benutzt, aus ihm also einen Geschäftsinhaber gemacht.   Hier sieht es mehr danach aus, dass er einfach keine feste Adresse hatte.

Er und seine Kollegen waren sich sicher, dass der Mann etwas mit den Morden zu tun hatte. Das ist natürlich subjektiv, da kein Beweis dafür genannt werden kann.

“We knew well that they had no intention of helping us. Every man was as bad as another. “
Er und seine Kollegen waren anscheinend mit Vorurteilen behaftet, teilten vielleicht sogar den latenten Antisemitismus dieser Zeit -

“I am sure they never once suspected that we were police detectives on the trail of the mysterious murderer; otherwise they would not have discussed the crimes with us as openly as they did.”
Zu diesen Zeilen und jenen davor frage ich mich, ob hier die negativen (enttäuschenden) Erfahrungen der Polizei mit dem jüdischen Zeugen Schwartz einfließen. Die Geschichte halt, dass ein jüdischer Zeuge einen Verdächtigen nicht identifizierte, weil er in ihm einen Glaubensbruder erkannte.

“We had the use of a house opposite the shop of the man”  –  also doch ein Ladenbesitzer?

Der Beobachtete ging eines Abends in Richtung Lehman Street, danach Richtung St George.
“As I passed the woman she laughed and shouted something after me, which, however, I did not catch.” Klingt fast, als hätte die Frau ihn gewarnt, dass er verfolgt wurde. Vielleicht erkannte die Frau Cox wieder, ohne, dass er sich ihrer erinnerte?

“In the end he brought me, tired, weary, and nerve-strung, back to the street he had left where he disappeared into his own house.”  –   Also doch Ladenbesitzer?

„It is indeed very strange that as soon as this madman was put under observation, the mysterious crimes ceased“

Der Schweizer Schriftsteller Dürrenmatt beschrieb in seinem Buch “Das Versprechen” sehr eindringlich, wie sehr der Zufall die Arbeit eines Kriminalbeamten beeinflussen kann.
Vermutlich kennen viele von Euch diesen Roman. Er wurde einst mit Heinz Rühmann unter dem Titel “Es geschah am helllichten Tag” verfilmt. So unterhaltsam der Film auch ist, mit dem Buch hat er herzlich wenig gemeinsam.
Wer das Buch nicht kennt: ganz ganz kurz.
In einem Schweizer Kanton werden mehrere Mädchen brutal ermordet. Einem Kommissar gelingt es mit mit Fleiß und einem nicht wissenden Mädchen als Lockvogel dem Mörder anzulocken.
Der Mörder (der von dem Kind als Zauberer betrachtet wird) versprach dem Mädchen wieder zu kommen. Die Polizei legt sich auf die Lauer. Der Mann kommt nicht zurück. Auch in den nächsten Tagen nicht. Die Polizei gibt auf und glaubt, der Kommissar hätte sich geirrt. Dieser jedoch gibt nicht klein bei (er ist kurz vorher auch pensioniert worden) und bleibt “auf der Lauer”, Tag um Tag, Monat für Monat....
Jahre später taucht sein ehemaliger Vorgesetzter zusammen mit einem Schriftsteller bei ihm auf – die beiden hatten vorher über den Zufall in der Kriminalarbeit diskutiert. Der ehemalige Kommissar ist immer noch “auf der Lauer”, besessen und verblödet. Sein Vorgesetzter hatte ihn schon vor langer Zeit darüber informiert, dass der Mörder nicht mehr kommen kann, weil nicht mehr am Leben, aber das konnte den Ex-Kommissar nicht mehr umstimmen. Er wartete weiterhin. Der Vorgesetzte erzählt nun dem Schriftsteller wie es war.
Vor einiger Zeit wurde er ans Sterbebett einer alten Dame gerufen, die ihm beichtete, dass ihr verstorbener Mann der Kindermörder war. Die beiden hatten keine Kinder und so wollte sie alles los werden, bevor sie starb. Ihr Mann war an jenem Tag, den der Kommissar  vorher gesehen hatte tatsächlich auf der Fahrt dorthin. Die Dame wusste von seinen Morden und das er “es tun musste”.
Doch er verunglückte auf dem Weg zu dem Mädchen tödlich mit dem Auto. Der ehemalige Kommissar hatte völlig Recht. Nur der Zufall verhinderte, dass er den Mörder überführen konnte.

Bin gespannt auf die Antworten meiner „Kollegen und Kolleginnen“!
« Letzte Änderung: 17.11.2013 20:54 Uhr von Andromeda1933 »

Offline Lestrade

  • Superintendent
  • *****
  • Beiträge: 2949
  • Karma: +14/-3
  • Watson, fahr schon mal die Kutsche vor...
Re: CID Officer Henry Cox!
« Antwort #6 am: 17.11.2013 22:00 Uhr »
Hallo Andromeda, “alter Denker“,

Vielen Dank für deine sehr interessante Meinung. Cox und Sagar gaben ihre Interviews anlässlich ihrer Pensionierungen. Es scheint, dass sie unbedingt darüber sprechen wollten.

Ich muss jedoch zusätzlich anfügen, dass die Angaben von Cox für die "Thomson's Weekly News" noch viel, viel umfangreicher waren. Ich brachte nur einen Ausschnitt/Zusammenfassung daraus. Im The Ultimate Jack The Ripper Sourcebook von Evans&Skinner gibt es im Kapitel 42, “A City Police Suspect“, ganz ausführliche Angaben zu Sagar aber vor allem zu Cox. Das geht insgesamt von Seite 702-710. Wer dieses Buch zur Hand hat, der sollte dies unbedingt lesen. Ich werde es morgen wohl wieder einmal tun. Soweit ich mich erinnere, kann dein Eindruck von Cox nur bestätigt werden. Der Mann war wahrlich involviert und wenn wir ehrlich zu uns sind, egal welche Meinung ein jeder vertritt, besteht eine große Chance, dass er uns über den Ripper und auch aus erster Hand von den Morden erzählt. Kurioserweise ist Pat Marshall, Ripperologin, eine Ur-Ur- Nichte von Henry Cox. Die Ermittler- Gene scheinen sich vererbt zu haben. Cox erzählt übrigens im Interview, dass der Verdächtige NIEMALS sein Jagdgebiet verschob. Es sollte sich um einen Mann gehandelt haben, der sich wohl (zwanghaft) immer im gleichen Gebiet bewegt hatte.

Frauenhass war sicherlich eines der Motive, was hinter diesem Lustmörder Jack the Ripper verborgen lag. Auch Macnaghten sprach von “großen Hass auf Frauen“ bei Kosminski. Übrigens, keiner dieser Männer (Anderson, Swanson, Macnaghten von der MET, noch Cox und Sagar von der City Police) erwähnten den Namen Kosminski öffentlich. Macnaghten nur in seinem “geheimen“ Memorandum und Swanson nur in einem privaten Buch. 

Zu den Shops:

Die Geschwister von Aaron Kozminski, könnten alle, mehr oder weniger, “Shops“ unterhalten haben. Isaac Abrahams hatte erwiesenermaßen seinen Garden Workshop hinter der 74 Greenfield Street, wo er ja mit seiner Familie wohnte. Direkt gegenüber lebte die Familie der Schwester Matilda Lubnowski in der 16 Greenfield Street. Wenn Du so willst: “a house opposite the shop of the man we suspected”. Ihr Mann Morris war einmal so etwas wie ein Stiefelmacher/Schuhmacher (Leather Apron!), später Obst- und Gemüsehändler. Die Familie von Bruder Woolf Abrahams zog ständig hin- und her. Mehrere Adressen in der Greenfield Street, dann die Berner Street (am Dutfield´s Yard), Providence Street, Yalford Street, Sion Square. Er war, wie sein Bruder Isaac, Schneider. Inwieweit auch Woolf bzw. Matilda/Morris, “Shops“ oder Dienstleistungen betrieben oder anboten oder einfach angestellt waren, kann man nicht sagen. Ich kenne einen Bericht aus der Yalford Street (von Charles Booth?), der über die Schneider aus der Yalford Street erzählt. Die arbeiteten teilweise zuhause aber eben doch (als Zulieferer) für andere. Warum auch nicht auch für sich ganz nebenbei? Isaac Kozminski war höchst wahrscheinlich, trotz seiner eigenen Werkstatt, ein Zulieferer für ein Westend- Haus. Da konnte er sicherlich besser von leben als sein Bruder Woolf. Über das Scheiderhandwerk in London würde sich auch wieder einmal lohnen nachzulesen. Vielleicht schlage ich auch da dieser Tage wieder bei Rob House nach. Alles hat man ja auch nicht immer auf dem Schirm…

Die verschiedenen Aufenthaltsorte und die verschiedenen “Shops“, würden gut zur Situation der Aaron Kozminski Familie passen. Denkt einmal an Matthew Packer mit seinem kleinen Fensterhandel in der Berner Street neben dem Dutfield´s Yard. In seiner Familie, hätte Aaron Kozminski solche “Einrichtungen“ zu gewissen Zeiten allein besetzt haben können und auch an verschiedenen Orten. “The shop of the man“ könnte auf einen “Hauptsitz“ deuten, den er überwiegend besetzte, weil er dort vielleicht für eine gewisse Zeit arbeitete und “his own house“ vielleicht auf eine Ort, den er seine “eigen“ nennen konnte, wie das auch immer zustande kam. Im ersteren Fall könnte es sein, dass seine Familie darauf drängte, dass er sich an den Arbeiten beteiligen musste (bestenfalls so gut wie es eben ging), wie vielleicht auch später mit einer Tätigkeit in der Butcher´s Row (über Jacob Cohen vielleicht), auch wenn er da unter Umständen (siehe Sagar) bereits völlig durch geknallt war. Reichte vielleicht noch für Drecksarbeiten oder als “Wachhund“. Im zweiten Fall könnte folgendes eine Rolle spielen:

Nach dem Double Event macht es den Eindruck, dass Woolf Abrahams mit seiner Familie aus der 25 Providence Street (nahe Berner Street/Dutfield´s Yard) wegzog und sich etwas später in der 34 Yalford Street wiederfand. Dort, in dieser Straße, lebten auch schon einmal seine Schwester Matilda Lubnowski mit Mann Morris und Rabbi Israel Lubnowski- Cohen (32 und 6 Yalford Street). Zwischen diesen Adressen, Providence Street und Yalford Street, hätte er auch noch woanders leben können und sei es nur bei seinen Geschwistern Isaac und Matilda. Lebte Aaron zur Zeit der Morde bei Woolf, hätte Woolf und seine Frau Betsy Aaron schlicht und einfach in der Providence Street zurückgelassen haben. Woolf und Betsy hatten kleine Kinder. Ich kann mir nicht vorstellen, wenn Aaron in Verdacht geraten wäre, dass sie so mir nichts, dir nichts mit ihm weitergelebt hätten. Ich glaube, Matilda war damals schwanger und sie hatten auch kleine Kinder. Genau nachschauen müsste ich allerdings noch einmal. Isaac und Bertha hatten damals schon größere Kinder meine ich aber auch noch Kleinere. Ich habe ja oft gemutmaßt, die Idee kommt von Rob House, dass Matilda eine geheime Informantin für die Polizei war. Sie lebte gegenüber von Isaac und der hatte hinter dem Haus seinen “Shop“. Die Polizei bzw. Cox, wollten von einem Haus gegenüber observiert haben. Das ist doch eine spannende Konstellation. Aaron Kozminski war schwerkrank, so oder so. Hin- und wieder brauchte er sicherlich Hilfe bzw. Fürsorge. Die Familie führte das auch aus. Ob sie nun einen mutmaßlichen Killer im Haus haben wollten, in dem ihre Kinder schliefen, würde ich bezweifeln wollen. Der Garden Workshop (The shop oft he man) von Isaac hätte sich zumindest als Schlafplatz für Aaron angeboten, genau wie die “verlassenen“ Räumlichkeiten in der Providence Street (his own house). Jedenfalls solange, bis er mal wieder weggesperrt wurde.   

 “The least slip and another brutal”: Wie würdest Du das übersetzen?

Auf jeden Fall besten Dank für deine Gedanken und Überlegungen.

Dein Lestrade.
Wer wartet mit Besonnenheit, der wird belohnt zur rechten Zeit...

Offline Isdrasil

  • Superintendent
  • *****
  • Beiträge: 2037
  • Karma: +2/-0
Re: CID Officer Henry Cox!
« Antwort #7 am: 18.11.2013 12:03 Uhr »
Hi,

ich muss mich derzeit zwischen meinem Interesse an Jack the Ripper und vielen anderen „Projekten“ im privaten Bereich (3 Leute hier kennen eines dieser "Projekte") entscheiden. Leider hat der Tag nur 24 Stunden, und ich finde kaum die Zeit, die Beiträge hier zu lesen, geschweige denn, mich näher mit zu befassen.

Ich bitte um Verständnis, dass ich hier der Antwort schuldig bleibe. So wie ich das sehe, finden sich meine Gedanken in euren Beiträgen eh wieder.

Kann sein, dass ich erst wieder an unserem Chatabend am 05. Dezember aktiv von mir hören lasse. Also schreibt mal weiter schöne interessante Beiträge, dann habe ich in den kurzen Pausen des Alltags wenigstens was zu lesen!

Danke für das Verständnis,
Isdrasil

Offline Lestrade

  • Superintendent
  • *****
  • Beiträge: 2949
  • Karma: +14/-3
  • Watson, fahr schon mal die Kutsche vor...
Re: CID Officer Henry Cox!
« Antwort #8 am: 18.11.2013 12:08 Uhr »
Also schreibt mal weiter schöne interessante Beiträge, dann habe ich in den kurzen Pausen des Alltags wenigstens was zu lesen!

Machen wa, war eben gerade dabei...

Vielleicht sollte ich das hier trotzdem noch in den Faden stellen, obwohl ich darüber schon oft berichtet hatte (gerade wegen der Shop Geschichte):

Erinnert euch bitte an die drei Versionen des Macnaghten Memorandum. Die Scotland Yard Version (1894), die Lady Aberconway (seine Tochter) Version (von Farson 1959 entdeckt) und an die Donner (sein Enkelsohn) Version, welche eine Freund (Loftus) des Enkels gesehen hatte. In den frühen 1950er war das, erzählt hat er darüber u.a. 1972.

Die ersten beiden sind allgemein bekannt. Die Verdächtigen lauten Druitt, Kosminski und Ostrog. Auch Loftus mit seiner Donnerversion nennt Druitt. Er erwähnt jedoch einen Leather Apron. Wir alle kennen John Pizer als Leather Apron aber wir wissen auch, dass er bewiesenermaßen unschuldig war. Dann beschreibt Loftus noch mit Sicherheit Cutbush. Auch das macht Sinn, denn wegen Cutbush wurde das Memorandum verfasst. Es fehlen Kosminski und Ostrog. Ich denke aber, Loftus sein Leather Apron war Kosminski. Das offizielle, Scotland Yard Memo nennt Druitt, Kosminski und Ostrog, auch die Aberconway Version. Loftus nennt noch Cutbush und der hatte eine Menge mit dem Memo zu tun. Soweit alles richtig. Loftus nennt jedoch nicht Ostrog aber wenigstens noch einen Leather Apron. Leather Apron war einer der ersten Verdächtigen im Ripper Fall, nachdem ernsthaft fahndet wurde. Pizer war es nicht. Pizer´s Wohnort lag aber keine 300m vom Wohnort Isaac Kozminski und Matilda Lubnowski entfernt. Matilda´s Mann war “Schuster“. Diese Geschwister von Aaron Kozminski lebten in unmittelbarer Nähe zu Leather Apron Pizer. Und wie gesagt, ich denke, der Leather Apron in Loftus Donner Version war Kosminski.  Diesen Leather Apron bezeichnete Loftus als Polish Jew cobbler nick-named “Leather Apron“ bzw. Polish tanner or cobbler.

Tanner or cobbler bedeutet Gerber oder Schuhflicker. Diese Tätigkeiten könnten dann, wenn Aaron Kozminski der Verdächtige Kosminski war, eben von Aaron zur Zeit der Morde ausgeführt worden sein. Zumindest zeitweise. Eine Frau, die Leather Apron kennen wollte, hatte einmal behauptet, dass dieser ein arbeitsloser Schuster wäre. Nun gut, dass war auch Pizer. Schließt aber nicht aus, dass dies auf Kosminski ebenfalls zutraf. Und gerade das hier zwei Berufe genannt wurden, ist im Bezug zu dieser ganzen Theorie spannend. Cox und Macnaghten sprachen von einem recht umtriebigen Mann, der an verschiedenen Orten zu finden war. Dies könnte auch ein Hinweis auf mehrere Shops sein.

Hier mal zum Gerber:

 http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lohgerber

Daraus dieses Zitat:

“Die Berufsbezeichnung Lohgerber bzw. Rotgerber leitet sich ab vom heute weitestgehend untergegangenen Handwerk der Lohgerberei, einer spezialisierten Form der Gerberei, die Rinderhäute zu strapazierfähigen, kräftigen Ledern verarbeitete, beispielsweise für Schuhsohlen, Stiefel, Sättel oder Ranzen. Lohgares Leder ist kaum elastisch, dafür gewinnt es beim Gerben auf Kosten der Fläche an Dicke und wird sehr widerstandsfähig gegen Wasser und schwache Säuren.“

http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gerben

Von Leather Apron sagte man, dass er ganz leise Schuhe trug. Der Schwager von Aaron, Morris Lubnowski, war in diesem Handwerk tätig. Aaron hätte ihn als Cobbler (Schuhflicker) bei Schuhreparaturen behilflich sein können. Das hätte ihm einen Lederschurz (Leather Apron) einbringen können. Die Rinderhäute für die Schuhsohlen und Stiefel kamen von Tannern (also Gerbern), wie wir lesen können. Rinderhäute kamen vielleicht auch über einen Furrier (Kürschner/Pelzhändler) wie wir ihn mit Martin Kosminski kennen oder eben auch über die Schlachter von Rindern, wie die aus der Butcher´s Row.  

Hier zum Cobbler:

http://www.1900s.org.uk/1900s-edmonton-cobbler.htm

Hier zum Kürschner:

http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/K%C3%BCrschner

Hier zur Ausstattung mit Gerbermesser/ Tanner Bag:

http://contemporarymakers.blogspot.de/2008/12/calvin-tanner-bag-with-tim-ridge-knives.html

http://contemporarymakers.blogspot.de/2008_08_10_archive.html

Aber, die Berufsbezeichnung von Aaron Kozminski war Friseur. Es gab Kozminski Friseure u.a. im East End. Daniel Kosminsky, der wohl nun doch ganz in der Nähe des Geburtsortes von Aaron stammt und aus dem gleichen Ort, wo die Frau von Woolf herkam und George Kozminski (auch Gabriel Kozminski), der jedoch in der weiter entfernten Stafford Street lebte. Daniel´s Adresse lautete 102 Houndsditch. Das war nicht weit vom Mitre Square oder von der Butcher´s Row entfernt, kurze Fusswege. Wenn man so will, auch nicht weit vom Miller´s Court. Selbst die meisten anderen Tatorte bedeuten nicht wirklich Entfernung. Lag ja ehe alles dicht beeinander.    
 
Dann hatte Sims mal über den Polen gesagt, dass dieser einmal in einem Hospital in Polen beschäftigt gewesen war.

In gewisser Weise passt das alles gut zu Aaron Kozminski. Es könnte schwierig für Aaron gewesen sein, beruflich überhaupt Fuß zu fassen. Er bekommt einen Job mit 15,16 Jahren in einem Krankenhaus in Polen, dann macht man rüber nach London und hier versucht er sich in einigen Jobs, meist über die Familie, wie z.B. Schuhflicker (bei Morris), er gerbt aber auch irgendwo Rinderhäute oder verrichtet niedrige Arbeiten wie z.B. die Innereien-Entsorgung an und rund um die Butcher´s Row (Jacob Cohen,Martin Kosminski), er muss in der Schneiderei bei Isaac helfen oder auch bei Woolf, ebenfalls Schneider. Vielleicht auch eines Tages bei Daniel im Friseurladen. Das alles hätte ihn an verschiedenen Orten des East Ends haben erscheinen lassen. Jobmäßig aber auch privat. Er schläft mal da und mal hier, seit Herbst 1888 aber nicht mehr in den gemütlichen Familienwohnungen sondern in den Shops oder in Hinterzimmer bzw. Hinterhöfen oder in einem anderen, gestellten Wohnbereich. Irgendwann kann er nicht mehr arbeiten und lebt nur noch auf der Straße.

Das man zur damaligen Zeit vielleicht dann lieber Friseur angibt, anstelle von Schuster (Lederschürze) oder Gerber (im Bezug zum Schlachtergeschäft) und auch vermeidet einen ehemaligen Krankenhausjob anzugeben, sollte nicht wirklich verwundern, gerade, wenn er einmal verdächtigt wurde. Solche Leute wurden eben beschuldigt, Schuster, Schlachter, “Ärzte“. Friseure nicht.  

Wenn man alles über Cox liest und sich das nun Geschriebene mit vor Augen hält, dann könnte es sich tatsächlich bei Cox um Kosminski gehandelt haben.
Wer wartet mit Besonnenheit, der wird belohnt zur rechten Zeit...

Offline Lestrade

  • Superintendent
  • *****
  • Beiträge: 2949
  • Karma: +14/-3
  • Watson, fahr schon mal die Kutsche vor...
Re: CID Officer Henry Cox!
« Antwort #9 am: 18.11.2013 13:05 Uhr »
@Isdrasil:

“The least slip"? Was meinst Du?
Wer wartet mit Besonnenheit, der wird belohnt zur rechten Zeit...

Andromeda1933

  • Gast
Re: CID Officer Henry Cox!
« Antwort #10 am: 18.11.2013 16:09 Uhr »
Ich stelle hier einen „Lösungsvorschlag“ zur Diskussion.

To „slip up“ bedeutet, einen Fehler (zu) begehen. In Bezug auf die Observation des vermutlichen Mörders bezogen, könnte diese Phrase wie ein düsteres Omen gemeint sein.

„Der geringste Fehler und ein weiteres brutales Verbrechen könnte unter unseren Nasen (Augen) begangen werden. Es war nicht leicht zu vergessen, dass bereits eines von diesen zur gleichen Zeit geschah, während einer unserer besten Kollegen die schlecht beleuchtete Straße am anderen Ende patrouillierte.“

Offline Lestrade

  • Superintendent
  • *****
  • Beiträge: 2949
  • Karma: +14/-3
  • Watson, fahr schon mal die Kutsche vor...
Re: CID Officer Henry Cox!
« Antwort #11 am: 18.11.2013 16:23 Uhr »
Danke Andromeda,

Ich habe es im Zusammenhang so aufgefasst, vom Gefühl her, denn ich kenne least slip nicht:

“Der einzige Ausrutscher…“

Da liegen wir ja dicht beieinander.
Wer wartet mit Besonnenheit, der wird belohnt zur rechten Zeit...

Offline Angel2ooo

  • Superintendent
  • *****
  • Beiträge: 177
  • Karma: +1/-0
Re: CID Officer Henry Cox!
« Antwort #12 am: 18.11.2013 16:28 Uhr »
Ganz kurz, später ausführlich:
Da ich ja kein Englischmensch bin hab ich mir das heute übersetzen lassen.  :pardon:
Wurde mir auch so übersetzt wie von Andromeda geschrieben.
3 Personen 1 Meinung. Dann muss es ja stimmen. 

Offline Lestrade

  • Superintendent
  • *****
  • Beiträge: 2949
  • Karma: +14/-3
  • Watson, fahr schon mal die Kutsche vor...
Re: CID Officer Henry Cox!
« Antwort #13 am: 18.11.2013 17:53 Uhr »
Danke auch Dir Angel!
Wer wartet mit Besonnenheit, der wird belohnt zur rechten Zeit...

Offline Isdrasil

  • Superintendent
  • *****
  • Beiträge: 2037
  • Karma: +2/-0
Re: CID Officer Henry Cox!
« Antwort #14 am: 18.11.2013 18:15 Uhr »
Ach Lestrade, du zwingst mich ja foermlich zum posten...
 ;)

"Nur der geringste Fehler (Versaeumnis) und ein weiteres brutales Verbrechen haette geschehen koennen."

Das waere meine Uebersetzung, ich gehe also mit Andromeda und Angel konform. Bezieht sich wohl auch auf die Schwierigkeit einer lueckenlosen Observation und darauf, dass nach Cox' Eindruck der Observierte jederzeit 'zum Sprung (Mord)' bereit war.

So, muss weiter...die Spachtelmasse ruft!